Jan 092015
 

 

car maintEveryone wants a car that runs smoothly, performs well, is well-maintained, and looks good. And in pursuit of all four, some car owners become so obsessed with maintaining their car, that they actually end up hampering the performance of their vehicle. They also end up spending more on their car, when it’s absolutely not needed.

When we talk about car maintenance, we mean, taking care of the vehicle’s engine, interiors, and exteriors. Maintaining the exterior, involves making sure that the car remains clean, the color fresh, and it looks shiny. Engine work, change of oil, servicing the car, etc., fall under engine maintenance, while taking care of the seats and upholstery, dashboard and controls is included in car interior maintenance.

If ever in doubt about your car and its maintenance, read through the owner’s manual, familiarize yourself with the mechanism and terms used, and then make your decision on which products to use for your vehicle. Compiled in this Buzzle article, are a list of myths that people actually believe in, and follow to the ‘T’, when it comes to maintaining their cars.

Common Car Maintenance Myths

Myth: Oil should be changed every 3,000 miles.
Fact
It is not necessary to change the engine oil every 3000 miles. Auto experts say that if the car is new, it can go without an oil change for at least 7,500 miles. But if your car is old, and is giving you problems, then changing your oil every 3,000 miles makes sense, only if necessary. Always go through the owner’s manual, as it clearly states when you need to go in for an oil change. The miles required for an oil change differ with each car model, but on an average, it is around 7,500 miles. Frequent oil changes do not really do much for the engine, but they certainly inflate your expenses on the car.

Myth: Synthetic oil is the best for all cars.
Fact
Synthetic oil is definitely good for cars, but it is not good for all cars. Older cars that do not give a high gas mileage should not use synthetic oil. The mechanical wear in older cars is much higher than that of newer cars. In the case of the former, there are more chances of an internal oil leakage, and using synthetic oil in these vehicles just ends up damaging the car. Synthetic oil is much thinner than normal oil that is used in cars, because of which, more of it is used in older cars. Since this oil is thinner, it flows more freely, causing the oil to leak out much faster. Synthetic oil is good for new cars, and the oil recommendations are always specified in the owner’s manual. The main reason why dealers insist that you switch to synthetic oil is because it is more expensive than normal oil.

Myth: Using premium gas makes the car fuel efficient.
Fact
The fact of the matter is that, premium gas does not do anything for the car’s performance; it does not clean the engine, improve fuel efficiency, nor is it purer than regular gas. Your car manual clearly mentions what gas is ideal for your car. Most luxury cars need premium gas as their engines are specifically designed to consume that kind of gas, but if you use premium gas in a normal car, you actually end up damaging your car’s engine in the long run. Premium gas is less combustible than regular gas because the former has a mixture of hydrocarbons that make it so. Premium gas is needed in high performing engines like those in supercars. If your car is running fine with regular gas, then stick to it.

Myth: Air conditioners hurt fuel economy.
Fact
Driving with your windows rolled up and the AC in full blast, actually does help reduce fuel consumption. How? When the windows are rolled down, aerodynamically, the drag in the vehicle increases, causing the engine to work harder to overcome this resistance. This in turn burns more fuel. Those living in populated countries that experience major traffic jams will disagree with me. Cars consume more fuel when in traffic. This is because, the driver’s foot is most often on the clutch, as he is driving with a partially-depressed clutch or half-clutch, if he is stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffic. When the clutch is half-pressed, the engine is still connected to the transmission and hence, fuel is being consumed, as against a fully pressed clutch, which disassociates the engine, enabling it to run on idle.

Myth: You should rev your car in winter to warm the engine.
Fact
Revving the car in winter does more harm than good. Yes, it does heat up the engine quickly, but the sudden rise in engine temperature can cause the cylinder to seize, the pistons to crack, and lead to extra pressure on the crankshaft, valves, bearings, etc. Also, friction increases between the various components in the engine of the car, making them wear out faster. Also, when you rev up your engine, excess gas enters the exhaust and triggers the catalytic converter. When this takes place, the emission filter that is usually made of ceramic melts. Another notable point is, even if you are in neutral and are revving your car, the gears are still turning. Thus, your car’s gears may get damaged.

Other Myths

► Myth: When you are low on brake fluid, you need to fill it up.
► Reality- The main reason your car goes low on brake fluid is when the brakes need looking into. Instead of filling up the fluid, get your brakes checked and take appropriate action.

► Myth: It is imperative to service your car in winter.
► Reality- Servicing and tuning your car should not be based on the weather. If your car needs a check up and service, it should be done regardless.

► Myth: Coolant has to be changed with the oil.
► Reality- Coolant can be changed whenever it goes below the required level. It is just a matter of convenience to do so with the regular oil change or during servicing.

► Myth: Local detergents are good for cleaning cars.
► Reality- Cars have their own specified shampoo, as the chemicals in the shampoo do not affect the paint or the polish used on the car. Local detergents like those used for clothes and dishes, should never be used on cars.

As technology advances, so do the myths involving the working of the machines. Be smart and read the owner’s manual carefully before following any of the ‘advice’ given by so-called car experts.

Article Source:

More posts:

 Posted by at 8:51 am Consumer Protection-Things You Should Know Tagged with: ,  Comments Off on Myths About Car Maintenance
Jan 082015
 

One of the reassuring qualities of contemporary cars is that they need much less-frequent service to keep them running well. Changing the spark plugs, breaker points, and condenser used to be a seasonal exercise, and body rust was accepted as a normal if unfortunate hazard of aging. Now many spark plugs can go 100,000 miles between changes. Electronic ignition has done away with the points and condenser. Chassis, suspensions, and even some transmissions are lubed for life. And factory rust-through warranties typically run six years or longer. What’s more, reliability has improved significantly. The result is that most late-model cars and trucks should be able to go 200,000 miles with regular upkeep.

Here are a few simple, periodic checks and procedures you can do that will help you get there.

Three key tasks

Check the engine oil

Do it regularly—monthly for a vehicle in good condition; more often if you notice an oil leak or find you need to add oil routinely. The car should be parked on level ground so you can get an accurate dipstick reading. Don’t overfill. And if you do have a leak, find and fix it soon.

Check tire air pressure

Once a month and before any extended road trips, use an accurate tire-pressure gauge to check the inflation pressure in each tire, including the spare. Do this when the tires are cold (before the vehicle has been driven or after no more than a couple of miles of driving). Use the inflation pressure recommended by the vehicle’s manufacturer, not the maximum pressure embossed on the tire’s sidewall. The recommended pressure is usually found on a placard on a front doorjamb, in the glove compartment, or in the owner’s manual. Also be sure to inspect tires for abnormal or uneven wear, cuts, and any sidewall bulges you can see.

CR advises that digital tire-pressure gauges (which cost about $15 to $25) are probably the best bet overall because they will give an accurate reading or none at all. Many pencil-type gauges (typically $10 to $15) are good as well. Note that to check the pressure in a temporary spare tire, which is often 60 psi, you will need a gauge that goes higher than that—say from 0 up to 90 pounds. (See our tire buying advice and Ratings.)

Give it a wash

Try to wash the car every week, if you can. Wash the body and, if necessary, hose out the fender wells and undercarriage to remove dirt and road salt. It’s time to wax the finish when water beads become larger than a quarter. (Read “How to detail your car” and check our car wax Ratings.)

Article Source:

More posts:

 Posted by at 3:16 pm Consumer Protection-Things You Should Know Tagged with: ,  Comments Off on How to maintain your new car
Jan 082015
 

The greatest single cost in car ownership is depreciation. Basically, the second you drive your car off a dealer lot, it loses value and will continue to do so until you either decide to sell it or it stops working.

By taking proper care of your car, keeping it looking good and running smoothly, you can ensure that it fetches as much money as possible when it comes time to sell or trade in. Following these five simple steps will work wonders in maintaining your vehicle’s value.

1. Keep your service records

Service records are the best way for you to show a potential buyer you’ve taken care of the car’s mechanical components. Without service records, it’s difficult to prove that you’ve changed the oil on time and that you’ve met factory service requirements. Most sellers will claim they cared for a vehicle properly, but actual records can give you an advantage. Records can be computerized or they can be put into a booklet in the car’s glove box. If your dealer or mechanic uses a computerized system, make sure to get printouts of all maintenance performed.

2. Avoid dents and scratches

Dents and scratches can happen when you’re parking, when you open your door or even when you place an object on your car. Cosmetic imperfections are expensive to repair, and can be a huge turn-off to potential buyers. Luckily, by washing your car regularly and taking extra care to avoid contact with other objects, you can keep your car looking like the day it left the factory.

3. Keep the interior clean

The appearance and smell of the interior can also impact the attractiveness of your car to a potential buyer. Most people wouldn’t want to buy a car with foul odors or food stains. To keep your interior fresh, avoid smoking, eating and drinking in your car. If you do eat or drink, throw away the empty food and beverage containers immediately, and clean spills with the proper cleaning solutions.

4. Don’t curb your wheels

Parallel parking can be a risky proposition if your car has alloy wheels. If you get too close to the curb, the edges of the wheels can get scratched or bent. Many buyers of higher-end vehicles pay close attention to the condition of the wheels, and will walk away if damage is readily visible. While it’s best to avoid damaging your wheels in the first place, professional wheel repair shops can refinish damaged wheels for much less than the replacement cost.

5. Polish faded headlights

After years of sun exposure, your car’s plastic headlight lenses will fade and turn yellow. While the rest of your car might look terrific, the yellow headlights will reveal the vehicle’s true age. Luckily, faded headlights can be polished by most auto detailers. Polishing the headlight lenses doesn’t take long, and shouldn’t be very expensive. Buyers will appreciate the difference when they compare your car to other cars of the same age.

Article Source:

More posts:

 Posted by at 8:51 am Consumer Protection-Things You Should Know Tagged with: ,  Comments Off on Five Easy Ways To Maintain Your Car’s Value
Dec 312014
 

kudIt’s not surprising to hear that the more time you put into maintaining and caring for your car, the longer it will last. But what exactly can you do to increase the lifespan of your vehicle? The team here at Logel’s has put together a list of the top 5 things you can do to maximize the life of your car.

1. Oil Changes: Regular oil changes are a critical part of your vehicles preventative maintenance. Oil helps keep all of your cars moving parts lubricated, reducing their heat by lowing the friction levels they create. Oil is also necessary to remove any grit or particles from clogging up the moving parts. Without regular oil changes, the moving parts of your vehicle can become stiff and worn, causing significant damage.

2. Tire Rotation: Depending on their position on your vehicle, your tires may wear differently. By rotating your tires, you reduce uneven wear which can impact performance and fuel efficiency.

3. Changing filters: There are a number of different filters in your car, but it’s the fuel filter that plays a key role in your cars performance. Fuel filters screen out dirt and other particles that can enter your car through the fuel line and impact your vehicle’s performance. With a worn fuel filter, these particles can enter the engine, causing decreased fuel efficiency and performance, or even complete engine failure.

4. Fluid Top-Ups: One of the easiest things you can do to make sure your car is running smoothly, is to regularly check your fluid levels. The most important fluids to keep an eye on are the engine oil, transmission fluid, coolant, brake fluid, and power steering fluid. While individually, all of these fluids have their own job, together they help ensure your vehicle runs smoothly.

5. Winter preparation: As Canadians, we know how harsh our winters can be, which is why we recommend vehicle owners do what they can to prepare their car for winter. This includes checking your car’s battery life, changing your windshield wipers to specialized snow blades, and making sure that there are no small cracks or dings in the windshield that could turn into large cracks. By doing this, you’re making the winter a little bit easier on your vehicle.

By following these 5 tips, you’ll help maximize your car’s life. Another great option is to use after market, or used products when fixing your vehicle. When bought through someone like Logel’s, you can rest assured that you’ll be purchasing safe, high quality products that will reduce costs, and allow you to use the money saved to maintain your vehicle longer.

Article Source:

More posts:

 Posted by at 9:08 am Consumer Protection-Things You Should Know Tagged with: ,  Comments Off on How can I Increase the Lifespan of my Vehicle?